SOPA sponsor Lamar Smith taking another shot at the internet

(via Boing Boing) Unlike SOPA, though, this one's a cheap shot.  Part of SOPA's functionality was to appoint "IP attaches," government officers whose job would be to pressure other countries into adopting SOPA-like regulations.  Smith's new bill, called The Intellectual Property Attache Act, seeks to replicate that function on its own.  At Boing Boing, Cory Doctorow points out that this method has been used before, in a long-game of changing US regulations:

The new bill, [...] will create a class of political officers who will see to it that all US trade negotiations and discussions advance SOPA-like provisions in foreign law. And as we've seen with other trade deals, one way to get unpopular measures into US law is to impose them on other countries, then agree to "harmonize" at home. (Emphasis mine)

 TechDirt.com points out,

The specifics of the bill appear to go further than the version in SOPA. It is clear that the bill itself is framed from the maximalist perspective. There is nothing about the rights of the public, or ofother countries to design their own IP regimes. It notes that the role of the attaches is:

to advance the intellectual property rights of United States persons and their licensees;

It looks very much like Doctorow and Clay Shirky were right, that SOPA, PIPA and ACTA, beyond not being the first, will certainly not be the last attacks on intellectual freedom on the internet.